Economics and Globalization Publications

248. Encounters with Wild Capitalism: Post-Socialist Environmentalism in Hungary

Jul 07, 2011
December 2001- At the meetings of ELTE Klub, a university-based environmental organization, heated discussions took place on the nature and challenges of the Hungarian environmental movement. In 1996, at one of the meetings, one of the members was asked to comment on the changes observed in the Hungarian environmental movement. Comparing the challenges faced by environmentalists under state socialism and in the post-socialist era, she pointed out that: "In the 1950s there was the belief that there simply weren't nature conservation problems in socialist countries because natural resources were being harnessed for the benefit of the workers. Today, nature conservation is seen as an obstacle holding back development and marketization. It's this vadkapitalista (or "wild capitalist") perspective that we are up against." more

ECSP Report 4: Bibliography

Jul 07, 2011
The following bibliography is a compilation of all entries from the three previous ECSP Reports and new additions from the last year. The Guide includes a wide range of publications, organized by theme, which relate to the various conceptions of environmental security. more

Best of the Beat: Highlights From the First Year

Jul 07, 2011
The New Security Beat, ECSP’s blog, was launched in January 2007 to shed light on some of today’s broader security issues, including water scarcity, environmental degradation, and population growth. The posts below are selected highlights from the first year. more

Iran in Latin America: Threat or 'Axis of Annoyance'?

Jul 07, 2011
The essays in this report reflect an effort to provide background and context for understanding Iran's relations with Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, Nicaragua, and Venezuela; the articles emphasize the foreign policy objectives and strategies of Latin American nations as well as the strategic objectives of the Iranian government. Originally presented at a conference at the Woodrow Wilson Center in July 2008, the papers have since been revised, translated, and updated. more

HIV/AIDS and Governance in Africa

Jul 07, 2011
Sustained human development is an essential precondition for any effective response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Africa, Nana Poku writes. more

140. Bosnian Economic Prospects and The Dayton Process After 1997

Jul 07, 2011
September 1997 - Nearly a decade after the end of the Cold War (black resigned, in the chess parlance chosen by one Hungarian observer), the issues in Eastern Europe are not black and white, but neither are they a uniform shade of grey. They are different shades and degrees of grey in which the security issues confronting the United States and the NATO alliance, especially an enlarged alliance, are likely to be defined from now on. For anyone unwilling to face these complexities, especially in a situation where all parties see the United States as the only decisive external force, "let them come to Bosnia." more

Final Acts: A Guide to Preserving the Records of Truth Commissions

Jul 07, 2011
Final Acts is a guide to questions of law, politics, physical preservation, and access regarding materials generated by truth commissions. For example, how do the records relate to the law that created the commission? Who owns the evidence? Are there political constraints on the preservation of, or access to, some records? Does the country have an institution professionally capable of maintaining the records? Final Acts also describes the truth commissions that have completed their work so far and the disposition, or in some cases the loss, of their records. More about this title can be found on the Wilson Center Press website. more

Is EITI Another Western Agenda?

Jul 07, 2011
Experience has increasingly shown that the abundance of natural resources does not necessarily produce rapid development in countries where they are found. Instead, paradoxically, they all too often produce poverty, conflict and corruption whose consequences become increasingly widespread and impact development, not only in the country in question, but more broadly in an interconnected world. The rapidly globalizing world means that these consequences transcend boundaries and threaten stability of both the developed and developing world. It is therefore common sense that a search for the reversal of this disturbing trend becomes a global collective. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.