Energy Publications

Mexico Matters: Change in Mexico and Its Impact Upon the United States

Apr 12, 2013
The book consists of seven short chapters. The first positions Mexico as a fundamental issue for the United States. The second delves into the origins of the country’s current situation and choices. The third analyzes the conundrum of the nation’s politics. The fourth describes the process of decentralization that overtook the country in recent decades and what that entails for decision making. The fifth explores the economy, where it comes from and how it has performed, as well as its current dilemmas. The sixth examines the issue of security and its complexity. The book ends with a few thoughts on the stakes and opportunities looking toward the future. more

Climate Change Adaptation and Peacebuilding in Africa: An Adaptation Partnership Workshop Report

Apr 04, 2013
A workshop report focused on three areas of intersection that have dominated discussions of climate and security links in developing country contexts. more

Going Beyond Nuclear: New Energy Security Realities for Japan and the United States

Mar 28, 2013
The Fukushima nuclear meltdown has forced Japan to reconsider its energy policy, and as the country continues to grapple with the aftermath of the crisis triggered by the March 2011 earthquake, public opinion remains deeply divided about the country’s future energy policy including nuclear power. The United States, too, is facing its own challenges, as a bonanza in natural gas within its borders in recent years is redefining the meaning of energy independence. How both countries are looking beyond petroleum to meet their respective energy needs, and prospects for alternative energy sources including nuclear power, were the topics of discussion at the latest Japan-U.S. Joint Public Policy Forum, held in Tokyo on October 31, 2012. more

LNG: To export or not to export, that is the question

Mar 15, 2013
The U.S. is rapidly moving from being dependent on imported fossil fuels to becoming a major world producer. In addition to our oil and coal, we are sitting on vast supplies of natural gas, and technological innovations have made it possible to tap previously unattainable resources. So what should we do with these new-found riches? more

Subcommittee Hearing: U.S. Energy Security: Enhancing Partnerships with Mexico and Canada

Mar 15, 2013
On March 14, 2013, Duncan Wood, Director of the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute, testified before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs’ Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere. The hearing, titled “U.S. Energy Security: Enhancing Partnerships with Mexico and Canada,” included a discussion of the Keystone XL pipeline and the Transboundary Hydrocarbons Agreement. more

Noticias - Winter 2013

Feb 21, 2013
Read the latest Latin American Program Newsletter, Noticias Winter 2013 more

Changing Energy: Canada and the United States

Feb 07, 2013
Americans are generally surprised to learn that more of the energy that the United States imports comes from Canada than from any other country. Really, you say? The United States imports 2.7 million barrels of crude oil and refined products from Canada every day, representing 24 percent of total petroleum imports—about twice what is imported from Saudi Arabia. more

A New Beginning for Mexican Oil

Dec 13, 2012
Based on the collaborative work of a high‐level group of Mexican energy experts during the first half of 2012, this report focuses on the issues facing Mexico’s hydrocarbon sector and the most important principles that must underlie the forthcoming reform of the country’s oil and gas industry. Although multiple diagnoses of the sector exist, in recent years there has been no fundamental examination of the principles that should underlie the nation’s energy policy. more

Snapshot: China's Waste Challenge

Nov 19, 2012
Every year, China generates 250 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW), or one quarter of the world’s total annual waste.To help deal with this problem, 155 incineration facilities currently operate in China, with an expected 300 facilities to be online by 2015. However, these plants vary drastically in their ability to control pollution and toxic waste from China’s incinerators is occasionally dumped into ponds or landfilled, belying the clean and renewable image promoted by the government. For citizens troubled by a lack of information from the government about incineration plants before and during construction, NGOs and grassroots organizations serve to fill the gap as sources of information, legal services, and advice. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.