Environmental Security Publications

290. Ethnic Cleansing, Communism and Environmental Devastation in Post-War Czechoslovakia

Jul 07, 2011
January 2004 - In the aftermath of World War II, Czechoslovakia expelled close to three million ethnic Germans into occupied Austria and Germany. These so-called Sudeten Germans had long lived in borderland regions ringing the provinces of Bohemia and Moravia, with the heaviest concentration inhabiting the industrially advanced north and west of Bohemia. During and after the expulsions, over two million Czechs settled in the formerly German areas, taking over houses, businesses and factories. The popular Communist Party controlled the resettlement process from the beginning in 1945, using its influence to create a web of patronage in the borderlands. This helped the Party win over 50 percent of the vote in north Bohemia in free elections in May of 1946. Even before Stalinism took hold in Czechoslovakia in 1948, north Bohemia's coal mining, power production and chemical industry were renowned. With the onset of a Communist policy of heavy industrialization, north Bohemia's industry became a model for the entire country. By the 1960s, north Bohemia also became known for its almost unrivaled pollution, with air and water so foul that trees died in waves and children decamped to the mountains for doses of clean air. more

ECSP Report 6: Event Summaries

Jul 07, 2011
Event summaries from meetings sponsored by the Environmental Change and Security Program between June 1999 and May 2000. more

ECSP Report 13

Jul 07, 2011
The 13th issue of the Environmental Change and Security Program Report details the non-traditional security threats and opportunities facing the world today. Complete report. more

ECSP Report 4: Special Reports

Jul 07, 2011
Special reports: Environmental Degradation and Migration The U.S.-Mexico Case Study, by The Natural Heritage Institute; and Solving China’s Environmental Problems: Policy Options from the Working Group on Environment in U.S.-China Relations, by Aaron Frank. more

Defusing the Population Bomb: Is Security a Rationale for Reducing Global Population Growth?

Jul 07, 2011
Urdal's analysis finds that population growth, land scarcity, and urbanization do not greatly influence patterns of war and peace, with a few exceptions. more

Understanding Environment, Conflict, and Cooperation

Jul 07, 2011
This publication is the result of an ongoing collaboration between UNEP and ECSP, exploring the environment and security nexus. Complete report. more

The Security Implications of Climate Change for the UN System

Jul 07, 2011
The policy brief explores the security implications of climate change, and provides policy recommendations for strengthening the United Nations’ capacity to respond to climate-related security threats. more

Hong Kong Conference Report: Part 2 (Chinese)

Jul 07, 2011
Through a generous grant from the U.S. Institute of Peace, ECSP organized a forum in Hong Kong to provide opportunities for 65 environmentalists and journalists from the three areas of Greater China to discuss improving the capacity of environmental NGOs and the quality of environmental reporting in the region. Part 2 (Chinese). more

In Defense of Environment and Security Research

Jul 07, 2011
Since the end of the Cold War, many policymakers and researchers have been rethinking and pushing the boundaries of the definition of security. Perhaps the most extensive and controversial part of this project has been the numerous and varied attempts to identify links among environmental change, conflict, and security. more

ECSP Report 9: Official Statements

Jul 07, 2011
Excerpts from recent official statements that prominently cite environment, population, health, and human security issues in the context of national and security interests. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.