Governance Publications

Report From Africa: Population, Health, Environment, and Conflict

Jul 07, 2011
Complete set of commentaries on population, health, environment, and conflict in Africa by Wangari Maathai, Marc Ravalomanana, John Katunga, Milline J. Mbonile, Nana K. Poku, Anthony Nyong, Kenneth Omeje, and Patricia Kameri-Mbote. more

Chapter One: Analyzing Environment, Conflict, and Cooperation

Jul 07, 2011
This chapter identifies ten methodological, analytical, and substantive opportunities for future research, and five areas in which focused analysis could bolster policymaking. more

PECS News Issue 4 (Summer 2001)

Jul 07, 2011
PECS News Issue 4 features discussions of the 2001 IFAD Rural Poverty Report and the film The Urban Explosion, and an article by Michigan International Development Associate John Williams on integrating population into conservation projects. more

ECSP Report 8

Jul 07, 2011
The 2002 issue of the Environmental Change and Security Program Report features 19 commentaries by experts worldwide on the most important issues for the Johannesburg World Summit on Sustainable Development and beyond. Complete report. more

308. Framing the Gap between International and Local Perspectives on Addressing Organized Crime and Corruption in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Jul 07, 2011
December 2004 - A careful look at the nature of the ongoing discussions about organized crime and corruption in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) between internationals and locals forces the observer to ask why there appears to be such a marked difference between the ways each side describes and understands the problems. The international community (IC) talks about BiH's organized crime and corruption problems in terms of institutional weakness and failure. International approaches separate organized crime and corruption from larger society as illicit, parasitic predators on an otherwise democratic state. In response, the international community conceives aggressive institutional solutions, which appear ineffective and land on deaf ears in the local communities affected by them. Local professionals—opinion makers, legal personnel, and business persons—describe the problems in terms of their connectedness to larger structural issues. They talk about how organized crime and corruption are part of a broader set of social, political and economic circumstances, in which the international community is a part. In the course of interviewing 266 local professionals, I discovered some important characteristics of the shape and scope of this discontinuity. The following is a short discussion about these findings. more

Hong Kong Conference Report: Section 1 (English)

Jul 07, 2011
Section 1 presents an overview of green NGO development in Hong Kong, Mainland China, and Taiwan, and paints pictures of three diverse environmental movements. Also includes Foreword and Table of Contents. more

ECSP Report 8: Reviews of New Publications

Jul 07, 2011
Experts review new publications. more

Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions

Jul 07, 2011
The volume, edited by Barbara Entwistle and Paul C. Stern, focuses on land use or land cover change where population is a prominent driving force. more

Argentina-United States Bilateral Relations: An Historical Perspective and Future Challenges

Jul 07, 2011
On March 5, 2003, the Latin American Program and the Cold War International History Project held a conference on "Argentina-United States Bilateral Relations: An Historical Perspective and Future Challenges." This book contains an edited version of the panelists presentations. more

Commentary: Debating Environment, Population, and Conflict

Jul 07, 2011
The recent publication of a host of significant material on environment, population, and conflict linkages dictated a special commentary section to supplement the lengthy book reviews provided in this 2000 issue of the ECSP Report. more

Pages

Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.