Governance Publications

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Changing the Approach to Crime and Violence in Latin America

Apr 02, 2013
This summary was written by Christine Zaino, Program Associate, Latin American Program, Woodrow Wilson Center and Program Director Cynthia Arnson. It is based on the report, "Seguridad y Populismo Punitivo en América Latina: Lecciones Corroboradas, Constataciones Novedosas y Temas Emergentes," by Latin American Program consultants Carlos Basombrío and Lucía Dammert. more

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SEGURIDAD Y POPULISMO PUNITIVO EN AMERICA LATINA

Apr 01, 2013
The report (in Spanish) summarizes the principal findings of a series of regional seminars held in Latin America and Washington, D.C., with the support of the Andean Development Corporation (Corporación Andina de Fomento, CAF). more

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OPCIONES PARA MEJORAR LA SEGURIDAD CIUDADANA Y RESPONDER A LA VIOLENCIA JUVENIL EN CENTRO AMÉRICA

Mar 25, 2013
Experts from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, the Organization of American States, and the City of Los Angeles, California, discussed strategies for reducing youth violence. more

U.S. Ambassadors to Mexico: The Relationship Through Their Eyes

Feb 26, 2013
What emerges in this publication is a nuanced portrait of the individuals who have been tasked with serving as the key link of the U.S. government with Mexico. Dolia Estévez's effort to bring their memories and their perspectives to light helps illuminate a little known part of the political relationship between the two countries. It also chronicles a changing relationship between these countries from "distant neighbors" to "intimate strangers," who are deeply dependent on one another and yet are only still getting to know one another well enough to manage the relationship. more

The Political Economy of Tax Reform in Latin America: A Critical Review

Feb 14, 2013
Brazilian researcher Saulo Santos de Souza of the Federal University of Pernambuco explores the multiple ways that politics shape and constrain tax reform in the region. more

How Should America Respond to Economic Opportunities in Africa?

Feb 07, 2013
U.S. policy toward Africa has been on autopilot for much of the past four years, following a laundry list of good intentions that established priorities for Africa’s well-being and U.S. security interests. However, a truly sustainable and forward-looking U.S. policy toward Africa should refocus attention on Africa’s opportunity as an economic powerhouse of the future, a strategy that combines both domestic self-interest and an opportunity to help Africa move forward. more

Africa’s Long Spring

Jan 23, 2013
Long before it came to the Arab world, spring swept through sub-Saharan Africa. In 1990, Mozambique drafted its first multiparty, democratic constitution. The next year saw multiparty elections in what had been one-party states in Benin, Gabon, and Zambia, as well as the overthrow of Mali’s dictator and, subsequently, the election of new leaders. Every succeeding year brought new steps forward for democracy—in Ghana, Kenya, and the Republic of the Congo in 1992, and elsewhere on the continent in subsequent years. The world only paid attention when South Africa joined the ranks of democratic nations in 1994. more

Has the Arab Spring Lived Up to Expectations?

Dec 17, 2012
On the occasion of the second anniversary of the Arab Spring, the Middle East Program (MEP) invited a group of experts from the region, Europe, and the United States to contribute to this publication by answering the question, “Has the Arab Spring Lived Up to Expectations?” more

The Next Industrial Revolution

Nov 20, 2012
The next industrial revolution will fundamentally change the way we make things, and where. Government needs to create policy frameworks that support the transition to a new manufacturing paradigm and we also need to have a public conversation about what this world should look like and what policies are needed to make sure that both society and the planet will benefit. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.