History Publications

Corrupt Circles: A History of Unbound Graft in Peru by Alfonso W. Quiroz

Corrupt Circles: A History of Unbound Graft in Peru

Oct 01, 2008
In Corrupt Circles, Alfonso W. Quiroz gives a definitive and thorough history of Peruvian corruption that dates back to the country’s colonial period. He demonstrates how corruption has been deeply embedded in Peru’s state institutions and has damaged the country’s prospects, and estimates the costs of corruption to the country’s development. more

The Art of Conversation: dialogue at the Woodrow Wilson Center by George Liston Seay and Peter J. Bean

The Art of Conversation: dialogue at the Woodrow Wilson Center

Oct 01, 2007
A collection of conversations from dialogue, a weekly radio and television series of extensive interviews. more

Re-envisioning the Chinese Revolution: The Politics and Poetics of Collective Memories in Reform China, edited by Ching Kwan Lee and Guobin Yang

Re-envisioning the Chinese Revolution: The Politics and Poetics of Collective Memories in Reform China

Oct 01, 2007
Re-envisioning the Chinese Revolution is the first comprehensive study of contemporary memories of China’s revolutionary epoch, from the time of Japanese imperialism through the Cultural Revolution. more

The Strategic Triangle, edited by Helga Haftendorn, Georges-Henri Soutou, Stephen F. Szabo, and Samuel F. Wells, Jr.

The Strategic Triangle: France, Germany, and the United States in the Shaping of the New Europe

May 01, 2007
Taking the perspective of France, Germany, and the United States by turns, The Strategic Triangle discusses a series of economic and diplomatic episodes and asks how they affected the countries’ relations with each other, with countries outside this triangle, and with international institutions such as the EU and NATO. more

The Three Yugoslavias: State-Building and Legitimation, 1918-2005 by Sabrina P. Ramet

The Three Yugoslavias: State-Building and Legitimation, 1918-2005

May 01, 2006
In this thematic history of modern Yugoslavia, Sabrina Ramet demonstrates that the instability of the three 20th-century Yugoslav states can be attributed to the failure of succeeding governments to establish the rule of law and political legitimacy. more

Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt by Charles Gati

Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt

May 01, 2006
The 1956 Hungarian revolution was a key event in the Cold War, demonstrating deep dissatisfaction with both the communist system and Soviet imperialism. Fifty years later, the simplicity of this David and Goliath story should be revisited, according to Charles Gati’s new history of the revolt. more

Race, Culture, and the Intellectuals 1940–1970 by Richard H. King

Race, Culture, and the Intellectuals 1940–1970

Oct 01, 2004
Toward the end of World War II, scholars and writers stressed the unity of humankind, but by the early 1970s, dominant voices proclaimed ongoing diversity—sometimes irreconcilable antagonism—among human cultures. To study this transition from universalism to cultural particularism, Richard King focuses on the major thinkers, movements, and traditions of thought, attempting to construct an intellectual history. more

Nationalism and the Crowd in Liberal Hungary, 1848-1914 by Alice Freifeld

Nationalism and the Crowd in Liberal Hungary, 1848-1914

Oct 01, 2000
Hungary’s revolutionary crowd of 1848 was defeated in 1849, but crowd politics remained central to Hungary over the next half-century. Nationalism and the Crowd in Liberal Hungary, 1848–1914 describes how the crowd’s shifting cast of characters participated in the making of Hungary inside the increasingly troubled Austro-Hungarian empire. more

India and Pakistan: The First Fifty Years

Oct 01, 1998
The independence of India and Pakistan signaled the beginning of the end of Western colonialism. The fiftieth anniversary of that independence, in 1997, offered an excellent milestone for considering their progress, problems, and prospects. For this purpose, nine well-known specialists presented papers at a conference at the Woodrow Wilson Center in June of 1997. more

Churchill as Peacemaker, edited by James W. Muller

Churchill as Peacemaker

Oct 01, 1997
Winston Churchill had an acute appreciation of what belongs to war and what belongs to peace; we remember his resistance to Nazi tyranny during the Second World War and his actions as a man of war. In this book, scholars from the United States, Great Britain, and South Africa examine his other actions and comments, those that reflect the primary focus of Churchill's long career: his attempts to keep and restore peace throughout the world, from Queen Victoria's little wars to the Cold War. more

Pages

Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.