Human Rights Publications

Women in Democratic Transitions in the MENA Region Cover Page

Women in Democratic Transitions in the MENA Region

Mar 14, 2013
The Rabat Conference in November 2012 was hosted by the Moroccan Ministry of the Interior in partnership with the Global Women’s Leadership Initiative at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Wellesley Centers for Women with support from Lynn and Bob Johnston. UN Women, UNDP, and the International Republican Institute provided valuable collaboration. Through this compilation of papers based on discussions at the conference, we celebrate the call for women’s centrality in the constitutional making processes and the negotiation processes involved in strengthening the rule of law in the MENA region. more

Challenges to Women’s Security in the MENA Region

Mar 07, 2013
On the occasion of International Women’s Day 2013, the Middle East Program at the Wilson Center invited a cross-section of women activists, politicians, academics, and entrepreneurs to give us their views on the challenges women face to their security. This publication, “Challenges to Women’s Security in the MENA Region” includes pieces from 42 women from 20 countries including the United States, Malaysia, Indonesia, and countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region shared with us their concerns, disappointments, and hopes for women. more

Noticias - Winter 2013

Feb 21, 2013
Read the latest Latin American Program Newsletter, Noticias Winter 2013 more

Africa’s Long Spring

Jan 23, 2013
Long before it came to the Arab world, spring swept through sub-Saharan Africa. In 1990, Mozambique drafted its first multiparty, democratic constitution. The next year saw multiparty elections in what had been one-party states in Benin, Gabon, and Zambia, as well as the overthrow of Mali’s dictator and, subsequently, the election of new leaders. Every succeeding year brought new steps forward for democracy—in Ghana, Kenya, and the Republic of the Congo in 1992, and elsewhere on the continent in subsequent years. The world only paid attention when South Africa joined the ranks of democratic nations in 1994. more

Women’s Rights Under Egypt’s Constitutional Disarray

Jan 16, 2013
Egypt’s post-revolution constitution does not explicitly prohibit discrimination based on gender or religion. It only recognizes women’s domestic role within a family “founded on religion, morality, and patriotism.” Clerics will have the final word over the new laws. more

Delivering Solutions to Improve Maternal Health and Increase Access to Family Planning

Jan 16, 2013
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), approximately 800 women die daily from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Almost all of these deaths occur in developing countries, with higher rates for women living in rural areas and among poorer communities. more

Reflections on the Adoption of UNGA Resolution Banning Female Genital Mutilation

Reflections on the Adoption of UNGA Resolution Banning Female Genital Mutilation

Dec 21, 2012
On December 20, 2012, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Resolution “Intensifying global efforts for the elimination of female genital mutilations.” This resolution is a very important step in the history of the women’s movement in the MENA region, especially at a time when women’s role and rights are being marginalized in a number of Arab countries. more

WPSP Institutes – Summer Institute at Wellesley College (2012) Report

Dec 18, 2012
The Global Women's Leadership Initiative (GWLI) is proud to present the Report of the inaugural Women in Public Service Project (WPSP) Institute. more

WPSP Institutes – Asian University for Women Institute Report

Dec 18, 2012
The Global Women’s Leadership Initiative (GWLI) is proud to present the Report of the first Women in Public Service Project (WPSP) Institute held outside of the United States at the Asian University for Women in Chittagong, Bangladesh. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.