Race and Ethnicity Publications

The Nationality Problem and the Soviet Future (1983)

Mar 21, 2013
Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #168, 1983. PDF 44 pages. more

Demography and Soviet Society: Social and Cultural Aspects (1981)

Mar 21, 2013
Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #123, 1981. PDF 81 pages. more

Population Redistribution and the Ethnic Balance in Transcaucasia (1980)

Mar 21, 2013
Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #102, 1980. PDF 37 pages. more

The Jewish Movement in the Soviet Union, by Yaacov Ro'i

The Jewish Movement in the Soviet Union

Feb 06, 2013
Yaacov Ro’i and his collaborators provide the first scholarly survey of one of the most successful Soviet dissident movements, one which ultimately affected and reflected the demise of a superpower’s stature.   more

Women, Migration and the Work of Care: The United States in Comparative Perspective

Oct 03, 2011
A new United States Studies publication, based on the conference: "Temporary Migrant Care Worker Programs in Canada and the EU: Models for the U.S.?" more

288. Ethnic Minorities and Access to Mass Media: The Case of Estonia

Jul 07, 2011
December 2003 - Approximately one-third of Estonian residents are not ethnic Estonians, and an overwhelming majority of that proportion of the population are Russian-speakers. Probably the most telling fact about Estonia's ethnic minorities is that only 38 percent of them hold Estonian citizenship, despite of having been residents for decades. The remaining are either stateless persons or citizens of the Russian Federation. Since 1998, the government has made efforts to encourage these residents to apply for Estonian citizenship. The major obstacle to obtaining the blue Estonian passport for many is passing the Estonian language proficiency examination. more

Best of the Beat: Highlights From the First Year

Jul 07, 2011
The New Security Beat, ECSP’s blog, was launched in January 2007 to shed light on some of today’s broader security issues, including water scarcity, environmental degradation, and population growth. The posts below are selected highlights from the first year. more

318. Representing Competing Entities in Postwar Mostar

Jul 07, 2011
November 2005 - Mostar was the most heavily damaged city of the 1992 to 1995 war in Bosnia. Ninety percent of its center was damaged and a third of its buildings were completely destroyed. Thousands were killed and tens of thousands were displaced from their homes and from the city, while tens of thousands of others moved to Mostar. This physical and demographic change clearly affected the city's postwar climate. However, the war's most notorious legacy in Mostar is the city's political and psychological division into Croat and Muslim sides. more

55. National Identity and Cultural Self Definition: Modern and Postmodern Romanian Artistic Expression

Jul 07, 2011
The scope of this analysis is to discuss the extent of change of post-communist Romania’s cultural society in its self-definition, with its reclaimed national independence and its greater exposure to Western ideas, as well as the extent to which it parallels inter-war national identity developments. Some of the issues addressed include the following: How have globalization and modernization affected Romanian artistic expression in the post-1989 period? To what extent is contemporary Romanian artistic expression using the language of modernity to perpetuate old symbols of national identity? more

215. Languages and Ethnicity in Balkan Politics: Macedonian, Bulgarian and Albanian

Jul 07, 2011
April 2000- The Balkans in general and Macedonia in particular have been characterized by widespread multi-lingualism. Ironically, while the term Balkanization has come to mean "fragmentation," the linguistic term Balkanism refers to shared grammatical and lexical features which originated through intense multi-lingual contact. Such contact could only have arisen under conditions of predominantly peaceful coexistence. Yet, although language served as a group marker, religion was a more important source of identity in Ottoman Turkey where it constituted the basis of an individual's millet ('nationality'). more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.