U.S. Domestic Policy Publications

Dependent America?: How Canada and Mexico Construct U.S. Power by Stephen Clarkson and Matto Mildenberger

Dependent America? How Canada and Mexico Construct U.S. Power

Jan 31, 2012
Following the acclaimed Uncle Sam and Us (2002) and the influential Does North America Exist? (2008), Stephen Clarkson—the preeminent analyst of North America’s political economy—and Matto Mildenberger turn continental scholarship on its head by showing how Canada and Mexico contribute to the United States’ wealth, security, and global power. more

Balanced Budget Proposal Tilts on Procedure

Nov 29, 2011
Part of the debt limit deal last August was a provision mandating that both Houses vote on an amendment to the Constitution to require a balanced budget each year. When the House Judiciary Committee reported a version that required a two-thirds vote to raise taxes, House Republicans reversed the committee in favor a simple majority vote to attract Democrats. In this article from Roll Call's Procedural Politics column, Don Wolfensberger comments that while the procedural acrobatics to make this change were complicated, they still left the amendment short of the two-thirds vote needed for constitutional amendments. more

The United States and China: Mutual Public Perceptions

Oct 19, 2011
Mutual perceptions between the United States and China are notoriously varied and changeable. This Kissinger Institute publication examines this broad topic through several lenses from distinguished guests from both China and the United States. more

A Better Way to Fund the Government on Time

Sep 20, 2011
Congress will not celebrate fiscal new year’s eve Sept. 30. That’s because: (a) it will not be in town; and (b) it will have nothing to celebrate. more

Mixed Records of Success for Joint Committees

Sep 06, 2011
If a camel is a horse designed by a committee, is a duck-billed platypus a duck conceived by a bipartisan, joint committee of Congress? We may soon know, as the Joint Committee on Deficit Reduction is mandated to report additional budget savings of at least $1.5 trillion over the next decade by Nov. 23. more

Debt Deal Shows How Process Becomes Policy

Aug 02, 2011
If you got the impression during the debt limit imbroglio that our leaders were creatively trying to extricate themselves from a box of their own making, you’ve been cribbing from Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s manual: Crises (fabricated or not) can advance worthy goals—even restoring fiscal sanity. It’s getting there that sometimes seems insane. more

Immigration and Security: Does the New Immigration Law Protect the People of Arizona?

Jul 29, 2010
On July 29, the first pieces of Arizona’s new immigration law, SB 1070, take effect without the most controversial parts of the legislation. The sections that mandated that Arizona police enforce federal immigration laws have been blocked by a federal judge pending further review.1 If fully implemented, the law would direct police to ascertain the immigration status of people they stop or detain while enforcing other laws, make it a state crime for immigrants to not have papers documenting legal status in their possession, and otherwise increase state pressure on unauthorized (some would say all) immigrants. more

In Praise of Deadlock: How Partisan Struggle Makes Better Laws by W. Lee Rawls

In Praise of Deadlock: How Partisan Struggle Makes Better Laws

Oct 01, 2009
In Praise of Deadlock explains the legislative process and its checkpoints, with a noncomformist respect for the hurdles and hang-ups in the American system. W. Lee Rawls offers a candid perspective on partisan struggle, which he sees as essential to advancing policy and generating consensus.  more

The Arts of Democracy: Art, Public Culture, and the State, edited by Casey Nelson Blake

The Arts of Democracy: Art, Public Culture, and the State

Oct 01, 2007
The essays in The Arts of Democracy represent the coming of age of one of the liveliest fields in contemporary academic life. Written by some of the most respected and accomplished scholars working in their fields, this volume illuminates the often contradictory impulses that have shaped the historical intersection of the arts, public culture, and the state in modern America. more

Building the Next American Century: The Past and Future of Economic Competitiveness by Kent H. Hughes

Building the Next American Century: The Past and Future of Economic Competitiveness

May 01, 2005
Public and private sector collaboration helped the U.S. economy recover from its last period of economic malaise, and similar collaboration is needed today. Building the Next American Century describes that movement, including its origins in the stagflation of the early 1970s, declines in manufacturing, and challenges from Germany and Japan. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.