Wilson Center Experts

Aili Mari Tripp

Fellow
Africa Program

Expertise:
Africa
Affiliation:
Professor of Political Science and Women's Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Wilson Center Project(s):
"Women and Peacemaking in Africa: When, Why and How Gender Matters"
Term:
Sep 01, 2007
-
May 01, 2008

I am a Professor of Political Science and Women's Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. My teaching and research interests are in African politics, comparative politics, and gender studies in an international context. I am the author of Women and Politics in Uganda (2000) and Changing the Rules: The Politics of Liberalization and the Urban Informal Economy in Tanzania (1997). I have a forthcoming book co-authored with Isabel Casimiro, Joy Kwesiga and Alice Mungwa entitled Women in Movement: Transformations in African Political Landscapes (Cambridge University Press). Women and Politics in Uganda won the 2001 Victoria Schuck Award of the American Political Science Association for best book on women and politics in 2000.I have edited Sub-Saharan Africa: The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Women's Issues Worldwide (2003), and co-edited (with Myra Marx Ferree) Global Feminism: Transnational Women's Activism, Organizing, and Human Rights (New York University Press, 2006), (with Joy Kwesiga) The Women's Movement in Uganda: History, Challenges and Prospects (2002) as well as (with Marja-Liisa Swantz) What Went Right in Tanzania? People's Responses to Directed Development (1996). I have published over 60 articles and book chapters primarily on women and politics in Africa, civil society in Africa, global feminism, politics in Uganda, and societal responses to economic liberalization. My research has received support from the Social Science Research Council, American Association of University Women, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, American Council of Learned Societies, World Institute for Development Economics Research, Institute for the Study of World Politics, Rockefeller Foundation, American Scandinavian Foundation, and other sources. I co-edit with Kathleen Dolan the journal Politics & Gender and co-edit a book series with Stanlie James on Women in Africa and the Diaspora for the University of Wisconsin Press. I was elected to the boards of the American Political Science Association (2004-06), African Studies Association (2002-05), National Council for Research on Women (2004-06) and Tanzanian Studies Association (1998-2001). I served as a Vice President of the American Political Science Association in 2006.I served as Associate Dean of International Studies (2003-07) and Director of the Women's Studies Research Center (2000-06). I will resume the latter position in 2008.
 

Education

B.A. (1983) University of Chicago, Department of Political Science; M.A. (1985) University of Chicago, Program of Middle East Studies; Ph.D. (1990) Northwestern University, Department of Political Science

 

Subjects

Comparative Studies,Gender Issues,Political Science,Women in Africa,Women in Politics
 

Experience

  • Professor, Department of Political Science and Women's Studies Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2004 - present (Associate Professor, 1999 - 2004; Assistant Professor, 1992 - 99)
  • Associate Dean for Research, Division of International Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2003-07
  • Director, Women's Studies Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2000-06
  • Research Associate, Program on Peace and International Cooperation, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Chicago, Illinois, 1989-1991

Expertise

Comparative politics, African politics, women/gender and politics

Project Summary

This study of post-conflict situations in Africa contrasts women's and men's peacemaking activities in Uganda, Liberia, Mozambique, and Angola. The character of women's peacemaking activities has often been either attributed to essentialized characteristics of women or dismissed outright as an idealization of women. The study hypothesizes that what distinguishes men's and women's approaches in post-conflict African contexts is not women's innate sensibilities as peacemakers and mothers, as sometimes claimed in the scholarly literature, by the press, and often by women themselves. Rather, women activists' unity around another cause - that of women's political, economic and social advancement - has shaped their peacemaking activities since the late 1980s and especially after the 1990s. This common cause has allowed women to engage in peacemaking activities at the national and local levels by building coalitions across ethnic and party differences in ways that are often (not always) distinct from men's peacemaking efforts.
 

Major Publications

  • Women & Politics in Uganda. University of Wisconsin Press, 2000.
  • Changing the Rules: The Politics of Liberalization and the Urban Informal Economy in Tanzania. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1997.
  • Global Feminism: Transnational Women's Activism, Organizing, and Human Rights. Edited with Myra Marx Ferree. New York: New York University Press, 2006.

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