Wilson Center Experts

Yeh-Chung Lu

Scholar
History and Public Policy Program

Expertise:
Cold War
;
Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding
;
Global Governance
;
Asia
;
China Mainland
;
South Korea
;
Taiwan
Affiliation:
Assistant Professor, Department of Diplomacy, National Cheng-chi University.
Wilson Center Project(s):
The U.S. Strategic Rebalance and the Prospects for U.S.-Taiwan Relations
Term:
Jun 03, 2013
-
Aug 28, 2013

Yeh-Chung Lu is assistant professor of the Department of Diplomacy in National Cheng-chi University (NCCU), Taipei, Taiwan, ROC. Dr. Lu focuses on US-China relations, and American and Chinese foreign policy. His research interests include IR theory, international security issues, international institutions, globalization, and nationalism. His publications appeared in scholarly journals as Wenti yu Yanjiu, Journal of Contemporary China, New Asia, and edited books. In addition to teaching and research, Dr. Lu provides his views to several ministries in Taiwan from time to time, including Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of National Defense, and the Mainland Affairs Council, etc. Dr. Lu is now in charge of a project commissioned by the Mainland Affairs Council. His opinions also appear on public media at home and abroad. Dr. Lu received his doctoral degree in Political Science from George Washington University, Washington, DC, U.S.A., and B.A. and M.A. in diplomacy from NCCU in Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.

Project Summary

In early November 2012, President Obama was re-elected in the United States and the Secretary General Xi Jinping was promoted to first among equals in China's ruling circle. These two events occurred within 10 days of each other, and yet the impact of this reconfiguration of political power will affect the world for years to come. This research seeks to investigate the shape of U.S.-China relations under Obama and Xi Jinping, and sketch out the possible future trajectory of this critically important dyadic relationship, with a focus on the Taiwan issue. The U.S. policy of “re-balancing” is likely to continue to shape the Asia-Pacific security situation in the years ahead, while China’s response may exacerbate the already fragile U.S.-China relationship with a high level of strategic distrust. Whether the U.S. would maintain the policy option with the name of “strategic ambiguity” concerning cross-Strait relations is central to future U.S.-Taiwan relations.

Major Publications

"Gone with the Wind? Strategic Distrust and U.S.-China Relations,” Defense Security Brief, Vol. 3, Issue 1 (Jan 2013) (issued by Ministry of National defense of ROC) (Co-authored with Szu-hua Chen)

 "The Global Financial Crisis and Its Impact on Neo-liberal Institutionalism: The Case of Six-Party Talks," Global Political Review, No.40 (Oct 2012), pp.45-66.

"Gulliver in Lilliput: China's Rise and Its Implications for the Asia-Pacific Region,” New Asia, Vol.17, No.3 (Oct 2010), pp.37-55.

Related Content for this Expert

Stay in Touch

Are you a Wilson Center alumnus? We want to hear about your latest move, award or project. Please send us your news at alumni@wilsoncenter.org.