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Broken Landscape: India’s Energy-Water Choke Point

Across the planet, two fundamental human needs --- energy and water --- often find themselves on a collision course. A new documentary looks at one such choke point in India, where coal mining and its negative environmental impact on water is the source of a regulatory battle with significant implications. We spoke with the filmmaker to learn more about this complex clash of needs. That’s the focus of this edition of Wilson Center NOW.
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Banning “Western Values” in China

China's Education Minister Yuan Guiren, has been speaking out about the threat of Western values and ideas on China’s college campuses. He said, “Young teachers and students are key targets of infiltration by enemy forces,” and added that “some countries,” fearful of China’s rise, “have stepped up infiltration in more discreet and diverse ways.” Can the government’s latest attempts to tighten controls over China’s intellectual discourse succeed? That’s the focus of this edition of Wilson Center NOW.
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Deciphering China’s Mixed Signals

During recent speeches, high-level Chinese officials delivered seemingly contradictory messages about China’s intentions as a world power. Does China intend to challenge the current world order or does it simply want to play its role within the current structure?
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Indian Prime Minister Modi to Welcome Obama for Second Time

President Barack Obama will become the first sitting U.S. President to visit India twice when he arrives under heavy security next week. He will also become the first U.S. President to be honored as Chief Guest during the annual Republic Day celebration. But the trip will be more than ceremonial, as President Obama and his counterpart Prime Minister Modi are likely to hold comprehensive talks on the entire gamut of bilateral issues in search of ways to enhance cooperation. In this episode of NOW, Michael Kugelman tells us what to expect from this important meeting.
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The Pivot to Asia: Are the EU and the US Partners or Competitors?

The Obama Administration has spoken of a “pivot” or “rebalance” toward Asia as a foreign policy priority. But the U.S. is not alone in turning its sites toward the Pacific. The European Union continues to focus more and more on the Asian continent as well. Does the pivot present an opportunity for the EU and U.S. to draw upon shared values and a history of cooperation as they engage China and other Asian nations? Or will we see increased competition as both seek to benefit from the economic opportunities the region presents?
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U.S.-China Cooperation: The Significance of the Joint Agreement on Climate Change and Clean Energy

The deal, a surprise to many, has been called, “historic.” Last month, U.S. President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping announced both countries will curb their greenhouse gas emissions over the next two decades. Is this the game changer that those calling for action have been waiting for? Will this create momentum for increased international cooperation? And what does the deal address beyond carbon emissions? China Environment Forum Director, Jennifer Turner provides analysis.
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President Obama’s China Trip: A Preview of What to Expect

A range of issues and events in Europe and the Middle East have prevented the Obama Administration from fully committing to its proposed “rebalance” to the Asia-Pacific region. But beginning next week when he travels to the region, the President will have another opportunity to put relations with China and other regional partners in the spotlight. Kissinger Institute Director Robert Daly provides a preview of the trip in this edition of Wilson Center NOW.
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America’s Longest War: What To Expect When U.S. Troops Leave Afghanistan

With the U.S. war effort in Afghanistan winding down, and responsibility shifting to Afghan security forces, Michael Kugelman provides insight into what to expect for the country and the region.
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North Korea Turns on the Charm: What Does it Mean?

Even with the reemergence of Kim Jong Un, questions remain about the mysterious nature of the inner workings of North Korea. The Wilson Center’s, James Person, who accurately predicted that Kim was still in charge when others were engaged in speculation to the contrary, provides insight into North Korea’s lack of transparency and its recent attempts to engage with other nations that have been described as a “charm offensive.”
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Hong Kong Standoff: A Look at the Big Picture

Crowds of protesters are shrinking, talks are scheduled, but frustrations on both sides remain. While many in the press and elsewhere are quick to reference the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, Robert Daly explains how what’s happening today is different in many ways.

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