5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Bring Your Own Lunch (BYOL) Policy Roundtable "The Left Turn in Alberta: What Does it Mean for the Energy Industry and for the Canadian Federal Election?"

August 06, 2015 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
The New Democratic Party’s stunning election victory in Alberta this spring has added another wrinkle to the already tumultuous story of Alberta’s, and Canada’s, year in energy. David Docherty discussed how the new government’s policies could affect energy production in Alberta and what the NDP’s win in Alberta could mean for the federal election in the fall.

The Pioneers of Amazon Research: A Conversation with Dr. John Hemming

September 08, 2015 // 9:30am — 11:00am
Renowned explorer and author Dr. John Hemming will present his latest book on the Amazon.

New Partnerships for Clearing the Air in Asia’s Cities

August 12, 2015 // 2:00pm — 4:00pm
Asian cities are at the frontlines in the fight against air pollution. These cities are engines of economic growth, but often lack the tools and capacity they need to better manage air quality.

Human Security and Development in the Arctic

July 28, 2015 // 9:00am — 11:00am
The Arctic is not empty; 4 million people make it their home. Rapid societal changes coupled with climate change have had a profound effect on local populations. Too often decisions about life in the Far North are made by people with no knowledge of Arctic culture or needs. Some countries have done a better job in human development than others. What works? What doesn’t?

Does the ADA give the US moral legitimacy as a global disability rights leader?: The view from Russia and Ukraine

July 27, 2015 // 3:30pm — 5:00pm
Human Rights play an important role in US-Russia relations. Rarely, however, are disability rights included in discussions of human rights in Russia and Eastern Europe. What are the key issues facing people with disabilities in the region today?

Ukraine’s Decommunization Laws: Legislating the Past?

July 24, 2015 // 11:00am — 12:15pm
In May 2015, the Ukrainian government passed four controversial laws aimed at initiating a clean break with the country’s communist past. Included in the laws are instructions on removing remnants of the communist past (monuments and street names), prescriptions on how to write the country’s history, as well as new measures to reconfigure the country’s archives. While the defenders of the laws argue similar measures were taken in other post-socialist countries and they are necessary to win the current conflict with Russia, scholars and other groups have questioned the impact on academic freedom, as well as freedom of speech more generally in Ukraine.

Cleaner and Greener Chinese Direct Investment in the U.S. Energy Sector

July 30, 2015 // 9:30am — 11:30am
Despite China’s slowing domestic economic growth, global foreign direct investment (FDI) by Chinese companies increased 14 percent in the first half of this year. Here in the United States, many of those investments are fueling new U.S. clean energy projects in solar, wind, battery storage, and other emerging clean-tech sectors. When channeled correctly these investments can be a boon for the U.S. energy economy.

Intellectual Roots of Putin's Nationalism and Ideology

July 21, 2015 // 10:00am — 11:00am
Maria Snegovaya discussed the intellectual trends that influenced Vladimir Putin’s thinking and partly served as an intellectual underpinning for the annexation of Crimea, the corresponding radical shift of Russia’s international doctrine, and the recent transformation of Russia’s post-Soviet identity.

The Role of Humanitarian NGOs in Turkey’s Peacebuilding

July 23, 2015 // 2:00pm — 3:00pm
Recent years have seen Turkish humanitarian non-governmental organizations play a growing role in international peacebuilding. To what extent can we talk about an interaction between the state and the NGOs? Is it a sustainable model or one dependent upon temporary policies?

Russia's Naval Power in the 21st Century

July 17, 2015 // 10:00am — 11:30am
Traditionally considered a land power, Russia's drive to develop as a naval power dates back at least as far as the reign of Peter the Great. As part of a large defense modernization program, Russia has invested heavily in recent years to develop its navy and acquire new capabilities. What is the state and mission of Russian naval power today? Dmitry Gorenburg and Olga Oliker will discuss the future of Russia’s naval modernization and how it may have been affected by the conflict in Ukraine.

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