China Mainland Events

The Origins of China's "Reform and Opening-up" and High-level Politics

November 02, 2015 // 10:00am11:30am
Cold War International History Project
It has long been assumed that China’s “Reform and Opening-up” started in 1978 when the Third plenum of the 11th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party was convened. In actuality, reform measures were initiated in 1977. In 1977, to promote reform, China’s top leadership made the decision to import advanced foreign technology and equipment. In this sense, reform was stimulated by opening-up.
Webcast

Help or Hinder? The AIIB and Outlook for Asian Development

September 11, 2015 // 10:30am12:15pm
Asia Program
The Chinese-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) has the potential not only to redefine the role that Beijing plays in development assistance, but also in shaping the organizational structure and governance of international financial institutions at large in the future.
Webcast

Cleaner and Greener Chinese Direct Investment in the U.S. Energy Sector

July 30, 2015 // 9:30am11:30am
China Environment Forum
Despite China’s slowing domestic economic growth, global foreign direct investment (FDI) by Chinese companies increased 14 percent in the first half of this year. Here in the United States, many of those investments are fueling new U.S. clean energy projects in solar, wind, battery storage, and other emerging clean-tech sectors. When channeled correctly these investments can be a boon for the U.S. energy economy.
Webcast

Making Food Safe and Sustainable in China

July 28, 2015 // 2:00pm3:30pm
China Environment Forum
The leading source of water pollution in China is not industry or municipal waste, rather the country’s vast agricultural sector—pesticide and fertilizer runoff from fields and animal waste from industrial-scale farms.
Webcast

The National Idea in Russia and China: Русский Мир? 中国特色?

July 23, 2015 // 11:00am12:30pm
Kennan Institute
Challenges in U.S. relations with great powers such as China and Russia derive not only from divergent national interests, but from distinct conceptions of nationhood, sovereignty, and modernity. Americans must therefore consider not only what the United States would like Russia and China to do, but how Chinese and Russians see themselves, one another, and the wider world, including the United States.

U.S.-China Relations in Trans-Atlantic Context

July 22, 2015 // 10:00am11:30am
Kissinger Institute on China and the United States
U.S.-China-EU relations are of growing importance, but the trans-Atlantic implications of U.S.-China relations are not as well understood as the Japanese, Russian, or Southeast Asian contexts. The Wilson Center is pleased to partner with the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy in hosting this discussion of U.S.-Chinese-EU relations.

Combatting Environmental Degradation and Poverty in Western China (Event in Mandarin Chinese)

July 06, 2015 // 3:00pm4:30pm
China Environment Forum
Join CEF for a meeting with Chinese NGOs that are at the forefront of the fight against environmental degradation and poverty in Western China

Cold War Crucible: The Korean Conflict and the Postwar World

June 25, 2015 // 9:00am10:30am
Cold War International History Project
Masuda Hajimu will discuss his new book, Cold War Crucible: The Korean Conflict and the Postwar World, asking, what, really, was the Cold War?

Book Talk: Energy, Economic Growth, and Geopolitical Futures

June 24, 2015 // 10:00am11:00am
Kennan Institute
In their new book, Stacy Closson and Evan Hillebrand forecast the most significant drivers of global economic growth over the next forty years. The authors discuss eight scenarios they have modeled of possible global futures, emphasizing the interconnectedness of energy prices, economic growth, and geopolitics.
Webcast

Japan's Vision Toward China: Conflict and Cooperation in a New Asian Order?

June 04, 2015 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Asia Program
Tensions between Tokyo and Beijing continue over islands in the East China Sea, while the two sides continue to be at loggerheads over the historical memory of World War II. Join us for a discussion on how Japan sees its relations with China evolving, and the diplomatic, economic, and security challenges Tokyo faces in dealing with its neighbor.

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