History Events

The Origins of China's "Reform and Opening-up" and High-level Politics

November 02, 2015 // 10:00am11:30am
Cold War International History Project
It has long been assumed that China’s “Reform and Opening-up” started in 1978 when the Third plenum of the 11th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party was convened. In actuality, reform measures were initiated in 1977. In 1977, to promote reform, China’s top leadership made the decision to import advanced foreign technology and equipment. In this sense, reform was stimulated by opening-up.
Podcast

Kerry in Cuba: Can Relations Become "Normal"?

August 13, 2015 // 10:00am11:00am
Latin American Program
Join us BY PHONE as three experts on U.S-Cuban relations analyse how will issues such as private investment be dealt with as the U.S. trade embargo persists? How can progress thus far on law enforcement and counter-narcotics cooperation, and search and rescue operations be furthered? What are the areas of common self-interest where collaboration is possible?

Ukraine’s Decommunization Laws: Legislating the Past?

July 24, 2015 // 11:00am12:15pm
Kennan Institute
In May 2015, the Ukrainian government passed four controversial laws aimed at initiating a clean break with the country’s communist past. Included in the laws are instructions on removing remnants of the communist past (monuments and street names), prescriptions on how to write the country’s history, as well as new measures to reconfigure the country’s archives. While the defenders of the laws argue similar measures were taken in other post-socialist countries and they are necessary to win the current conflict with Russia, scholars and other groups have questioned the impact on academic freedom, as well as freedom of speech more generally in Ukraine.
Webcast

Seeking Historical Reconciliation: The U.S. Role in Fostering Relations Between Japan and South Korea

July 23, 2015 // 10:30am12:00pm
Asia Program
Democratic ideals and cultural exchanges among nations have been seen as effective tools to encourage reconciliation between former adversaries. But that seemingly has not been the case in relations between Japan and South Korea, even if democratic values are shared. Wilson Center Fellow and Waseda University professor Toyomi Asano notes that it is important to share memories of the United States-led process of decolonization after the Japanese Empire’s defeat.

Religion and the Encounter with Modernity: What Can We Learn from Jewish Urbanization?

June 30, 2015 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
This talk uses the case of Jewish urbanization in the nineteenth century to discuss some of the ways religious leaders and communities engage with the fear and possibility presented by modernity. What are the political implications for theological and cultural nostalgia? Can we understand why some responses are more violent than others? Is there anything to be done about it?

Ode To My Father: Korean War & Divided Families

June 03, 2015 // 5:30pm9:30pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
This very special screening of "Ode To My Father: Korean War & Divided Families" is held in support of legislation encouraging family reunions between Korean-Americans and North Koreans (H.CON.RES 40) and to strengthen the US-ROK alliance.

To Have and to Hold: Gender Regimes and Property Rights in Twentieth Century Romania

May 20, 2015 // 10:00am11:00am
Global Europe Program
The meaning of citizenship has changed profoundly over the twentieth century, with women experiencing the most radical shifts in how their rights and duties have been defined and protected by the state. Visiting Scholar Maria Bucur follows the changes that have affected women in Romania in the area of property rights.

The Swastika Epidemic: Global Antisemitism and Human Rights Activism in the Cold War 1960s

May 11, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Antisemitism is on the rise today in Europe and around the world, but there is no consensus about how the global community should respond. In this talk, drawn from his forthcoming book, scholar James Loeffler offers a historical perspective on this debate by looking back on the first major episode of global antisemitic violence after World War II, the “Swastika Epidemic” of 1960.

The Reagan Era: From a "New Cold War" to the "Washington Consensus"

May 04, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In "The Reagan Era," Doug Rossinow gives a full and rounded view of how the foreign policies of Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush took America—through a sometimes chaotic path, one marked with war scares, troop deployments, indirect warfare, scandal, and diplomatic triumphs—to the edge of a new era of American predominance.

Luther’s Fortress: Martin Luther and His Reformation Under Siege

May 04, 2015 // 2:00pm3:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Woodrow Wilson Center Senior Scholar and Historian James Reston, Jr's newest book "Luther's Fortress: Martin Luther and His Reformation Under Siege" describes a crucial but little-known episode in Martin Luther’s life and reveals its pivotal role in the history of Christianity. Drawing on Luther’s correspondence, notes, and other writings, Reston presents an earthy, gripping portrait of the Reformation’s architect during his time in excommunication.

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