History Events

2015 Ahtisaari Symposium: New Evidence and Perspectives on the Helsinki Accords

April 27, 2015 // 9:00am12:30pm
Global Europe Program
The Ahtisaari Symposium series, established at the Wilson Center in 2010 in honor of Nobel Laureate and former Finnish President Martti Ahtisaari, provides a forum for discussion of historical and policy perspectives on vital European security issues. In cooperation with the University of Helsinki, the Wilson Center also hosts a scholarship program for Finnish professionals from the scholarly, media, business and public policy communities.
Webcast

Rethinking US International Broadcasting: A Conversation on Mission, Strategy, and Organization

April 22, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
By many accounts, U.S. international broadcasting’s mission is unclear, its attachment to U.S. foreign policy strategies tenuous, and its organizational structure ineffective. Many see the entire enterprise as broken. For a new assessment, “Reassessing U.S. International Broadcasting,” co-authors S. Enders Wimbush and Elizabeth M. Portale interviewed some 30 individuals with extensive experience in foreign policy strategy, international relations, international broadcasting, public diplomacy, and promotion of human rights and democracy. Join us in a discussion on the future of US international broadcasting.

The History Manifesto

April 20, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
How should historians speak truth to power - and why does it matter? Why is five hundred years better than five months or five years as a planning horizon? And why is history - especially long-term history - so essential to understanding the multiple pasts which gave rise to our conflicted present? The History Manifesto is a call to arms to historians and everyone interested in the role of history in contemporary society.

Remembering WWII: the 70th Anniversary of Victory

April 20, 2015 // 3:00pm6:00pm
Kennan Institute
May 2015 marks 70 years since the momentous victory of the allied forces in Europe. Victory was achieved only through enormous sacrifice and global cooperation amongst the allies. The Kennan Institute hosted a panel discussion of U.S.-Soviet partnership during the war. The panel was followed by a reception, sponsored by the Russian Embassy, to launch a month-long exhibit of archival photos that chronicle the U.S.-Soviet war effort.

Rivalry and Alliance Politics in Cold War Latin America

April 13, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Rivalry and Alliance Politics in Cold War Latin America, the first systematic analysis of these conflicts among US allies, argues that bureaucratic interests, rather than international mistrust or diplomatic missteps, fueled protracted rivalry among allies. Author Christopher Darnton discusses four critical conflict-resolution initiatives between Argentina and Brazil from 1949 to 1980, based on research in both countries’ foreign ministry archives.

Hafu: The Mixed-Race Experience in Japan

April 13, 2015 // 2:00pm4:15pm
Asia Program
With nearly 98 percent of the population believed to be nationals of the country, Japan can seem to be a racially homogenous society. For foreigners already calling Japan home, though, living in a country where there is little racial diversity can be a challenge. That includes those who are half-Japanese.

Murdering Patrice Lumumba

March 30, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
When Belgium relinquished control of the Belgian Congo in June 1960, a charismatic Patrice Lumumba became prime minister of the new Republic. Stability immediately broke down. The army mutinied, while Katanga Province seceded. Six months later Lumumba was murdered in Katanga; his undisputed rule as Congo’s first democratically elected leader had lasted ten weeks. Over fifty years later, the circumstances and symbolism of Lumumba’s assassination still troubled people around the world. Bruce Kuklick examines this defining event in postcolonial Africa. He reveals a tangled international political history in which many people—black and white, well-meaning and ruthless, African, European, and American—bear responsibility for the untimely death of a national dream.
Webcast

The Modi Effect: Inside Narendra Modi’s Campaign to Transform India

March 30, 2015 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Asia Program
Nearly one year ago, India kicked off a five-week election process that would ultimately produce a resounding victory for Narendra Modi. With more than 800 million eligible voters, India’s 2014 national election was the largest—and longest—in history. Lance Price was given exclusive access to Modi and his top advisers to write The Modi Effect.

Book Talk: "Gulag Town, Company Town Forced Labor and Its Legacy in Vorkuta"

March 25, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
What was the relationship between the Gulag and Soviet society? What was the legacy of Stalin's massive system of forced labor? This talk explored answers to these questions using the case of Vorkuta, one of the Soviet Union's most notorious prison camp complexes.

Mourning Lincoln: Rethinking the Aftermath of the Civil War

March 23, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Public responses to Lincoln’s assassination have been well chronicled, but Martha Hodes is the first to delve into personal and private responses—of African Americans and whites, Yankees and Confederates, soldiers and civilians—investigating the story of the nation’s first presidential assassination on a human scale. Black freedom, the fate of former Confederates, and the future of the nation were at stake for everyone, whether they grieved or rejoiced when they heard the news.

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