About the Cold War International History Project

The Latest from the Cold War International History Project

Call for Proposals: Postdoctoral Fellowships at the Berlin Center for Cold War Studies

Article //
Sep 12, 2014
The Berlin Center for Cold War Studies, slated to open in Spring of 2015, is seeking proposals for 2 available postdoctoral fellowships on the history of the Cold War. more

North Korean Apprentices in China and the Nature of Socialist Exchanges in the 1950s

Publication //
Sep 11, 2014
After 1953, China hosted thousands of North Koreans for industrial training programs and internships. Although the intention of hosting interns was to assist North Korea with its post-war economic reconstruction, newly translated Chinese documents reveal that the training programs were, at their core, really about politics. more

Burning Secrets of the Corfu Channel Incident

Publication //
Sep 09, 2014
Using declassified Albanian documents and recently released British documents, CWIHP Working Paper No. 70 examines the Corfu Channel Incident and subsequent legal case at the International Court of Justice. more

Caught in the Split: Chinese Students in the Soviet Union, 1960-1965

Publication //
Aug 29, 2014
After the ideological contradictions between China and the Soviet Union were made public in 1960, the circumstances under which Chinese students were sent to the Soviet Union became increasingly complex. Newly translated Chinese Foreign Ministry Documents reveal the fallout from the March 1965 protests staged by Chinese and Vietnamese students in Moscow. more

North Korean War Orphans in Transnational Educational Exchange

Event //
August 27, 2014 // 2:00pm3:00pm
More than 100,000 children from both North and South Korea were orphaned during the Korean War. In 1953, the North Korean government dispatched 1,200 orphans to the People’s Republic of Poland to be educated at a boarding school transformed into an orphanage. The orphans were repatriated after six years, at the insistence of the North Korean government, as tensions between Pyongyang and its communist allies began to emerge. NKIDP Intern Intaek Hong examines the complicated process of how the orphans defined their identity based on their experience of interacting with their Polish teachers—who became like foster parents—and deploying their subjectivity in the process. more

Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Laura Deal // Catalog Specialist
  • Pieter Biersteker // Editorial Assistant
  • Charles Kraus // Program Assistant
  • Evan Pikulski // Program Assistant
  • Roy O. Kim // Program Assistant
  • James Person // Deputy Director, History and Public Policy Program; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project