MEDIA ADVISORY: East African Experts Discuss Population, Health, Environment at Wilson Center

Projects in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania Use Integrated Approach

May 05, 2008

WASHINGTON—The countries of East Africa—including Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania—face the interconnected challenges of population pressures, poor health services, and environmental degradation. But some innovative development programs are integrating population-health-environment (PHE) projects to more efficiently address these linked problems.

On May 8th, three dynamic leaders from the East Africa PHE Network, which connects programs from Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya, Rwanda, and Ethiopia, will speak about their work:

Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka is the founder and CEO of Conservation Through Public Health (CTPH) in Uganda, which works to improve human and animal health in and around protected areas, including Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, home to Uganda's endangered mountain gorillas.

Kuntai Karmushu is the coordinator of health and conservation programs at Il Ngwesi Group Ranch, a communally owned project in northern Kenya that seeks to raise livestock sustainably and improve its community's quality of life, while also reintroducing rhinos and other key species.

Emmanuel Mtiti is the program director of the Jane Goodall Institute's Greater Gombe Ecosystem Program in Tanzania, which supports sustainable livelihood projects designed to reduce deforestation and rebuild chimpanzee habitat.

This meeting is the fifth event in ECSP's year-long meeting series "PHE: Building the Foundation for the Next 10 Years."

RSVP/Watch Live Webcast.

What: Population, Health, and Environment: Lessons From East Africa

Who: Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka, Founder and CEO, Conservation Through Public Health, Uganda
Kuntai Karmushu, Coordinator, Health and Conservation Programs, Il Ngwesi Group Ranch, Kenya
Emmanuel Mtiti, Program Director, Greater Gombe Ecosystem Program, Jane Goodall Institute, Tanzania

When: Thursday, May 8, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. (Lunch will be served)

Where: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, 6th Floor Board Room
1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.

Media planning to cover the event should contact Erin Mosely at erin.mosely@wilsoncenter.org or (202) 691-4266.

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is the living, national memorial to President Wilson established by Congress in 1968 and headquartered in Washington, D.C. It is a nonpartisan institution, supported by public and private funds, engaged in the study of national and world affairs.

Since 1994, the Wilson Center's Environmental Change and Security Program has explored the connections among environmental challenges and their links to conflict and security.

EMAIL UPDATES

Upcoming Events

Cities at the Center of the World

April 22, 2014 // 9:00am4:00pm

Increasing Resilience to Climate Change

April 23, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm

Experts & Staff