The Woodrow Wilson Center Press

What People are Saying

“Dennis Kux’s book possesses a wealth of new information, based partly on fresh research in published and archival sources, but based even more impressively on the more than 100 personal interviews he conducted with former diplomats and defense officials in both the United States and Pakistan.”—Robert J. McMahon, University of Florida

“Kux’s study is, to my knowledge, the first full-dress, comprehensive, and authoritative study of U.S.-Pakistan relations. Focused primarily on formal diplomacy between these two countries, it systematically chronicles the major events, deftly handles the primary issues, and sympathetically considers the key political and diplomatic figures on both sides.”—Robert Wirsing, University of South Carolina

“Dennis Kux’s book offers a clear guide to the ever-changing fortunes of U.S.–Pakistan relations. The book is a must-read for anyone who seeks to understand the complex U.S.–Pakistan relationship and the role of this troubled relationship in the region and the world beyond.”—Ambassador Thomas R. Pickering

“This judicious chronicle of U.S.-Pakistani relations from the 1940s to the twenty-first century is bound to be the definitive work on the topic.”—Thoms W. Simons Jr., Journal of Cold War Studies

Chapter List

Foreword
Edward M. Rowell and Kenneth N. Rogers, Jr.

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1. The United States and the Pakistan Movement

2. Truman: Friends, Not Allies

3. Eisenhower I: America’s Most Allied Ally in Asia

4. Eisenhower II: Ike Likes Ayub

5. Kennedy: Alliance Troubles

6. Johnson: The Alliance Unravels

7. Nixon: The Tilt

8. Ford: Enter the Nuclear Issue

9. Carter: The Low Point

10. Reagan: Partners Again

11. Bush: The Partnership Collapses

12. Clinton: Living with a Nuclear Pakistan

13. An Unstable Partnership

Notes
Bibliography
Interviews and Oral Histories

About Woodrow Wilson Center Press

Woodrow Wilson Center Press publishes books by fellows, other resident scholars, and staff written in substantial part at the Wilson Center.