Program

Globalization, Trade & Finance

Issues in this Series

Negotiations for a Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

William Krist and Kent Hughes
The TPP is a major attempt to update the rules governing international trade to meet new challenges. In this paper, Wilson Center Senior Scholar William Krist puts the TPP negotiations in a historic context, assesses the current state of the negotiations, examines a number of key issues involved and explores the implication of new members joining the negotiations.

New Thinking in International Trade: Global Competition and Comparative Advantage

The volume features recent work by Nobel Laureate Paul Samuelson and a thought provoking book, Global Trade and Conflicting National Interest by Ralph Gomory, the recently retired director of the Sloan Foundation, and New York University Professor William Baumol. Using different approaches, the three authors point to the ability of public and private sectors to change a country's comparative advantage in ways that can reduce the gains from trade for the United States or other advanced industrial countries. The volume also features a number of commentators who amplify, complement, or question the importance of the findings of the three authors. The conference on new thinking in international trade was made possible through a generous grant of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

New Thinking in International Trade: National Strategies to Build Comparative Advantage

The second volume notes that several countries are, in fact, working to change their comparative advantage by making investments in education, research and development, and infrastructure. They are also adopting policies that create an environment that encourages private sector investment and risk taking. In discussing how the United States should respond to the shifting comparative advantage of our trading partners, Senators Lamar Alexander and Jeff Bingaman stress the importance of increased investments in the physical sciences and the need to improve mathematics and science education. Other conference participants focus on policies in key regions of the world and still others urge attention to the U.S. current account and fiscal deficits. The conference on new thinking in international trade was made possible through a generous grant of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Tools of the Trade: Models for Trade Policy Analysis

Edited by Christine McDaniel, Ken Reinert, and Kent Hughes, Tools of the Trade: Models for Trade Policy Analysis was published in January 2008 based on the analysis of experts and policymakers at a conference held on January 22nd and 23rd, 2004, by the Woodrow Wilson Center and the U.S. Department of Commerce.The goal of the "Empirical Trade Analysis Conference: Strengthening Analytical Capabilities to Support Trade Negotiations" was to assess the strengths and weaknesses of economic models and their ability to inform trade policy questions.An event held on January 15th, 2008, "Today's Trade Policy Landscape", launched the report and hosted U.S. Trade Representative Susan C. Schwab.

The Impact of Trade Liberalization on Poverty

On April 15, 2005, the Wilson Center, in conjunction with the U.S. Agency for International Development, hosted four panels of policymakers, academics, and experts to examine the links between trade liberalization and poverty reduction. This report provides a nuanced exploration of the relationship between free trade and the world's poorest peoples.

NAFTA at 10: Progress, Potential, and Precedents (Volume One)

The Wilson Center hosted on December 9, 2002 a major conference reflecting on the first decade of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Volume One of this report provides conference proceedings.

NAFTA at 10: Progress, Potential, and Precedents (Volume Two)

The Wilson Center hosted on December 9, 2002 a major conference reflecting on the first decade of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Volume Two of the conference report features remarks by former U.S. President George H. W. Bush, former President Carlos Salinas of Mexico, and former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney of Canada.

China and the WTO: Domestic Challenges and International Pressures

Report on a December 11, 2001, Wilson Center Conference focused on three major challenges posed by China's membership in the WTO: adjust in the rural sector; the impact on China's state run enterprises; and the myriad adjustments China will make as it meets its WTO obligations. Click on the attachment for a free PDF version.

Coordinating Colors: The WTO Green Box and Green Payments in Farm Programs

Report examining the conservation and environmental issues in the agricultural subsidies debate at the controversial heart of the WTO Doha Development Round discussions.

The Currency Conundrum

On January 11, 2001, the Wilson Center hosted a day-long conference on the world's major currencies, addressing the growing importance of currency values and exchange rates, and analyzing the options for U.S. policy. This conference report features formal presentations, discussions, and analysis from top finance officials, scholars, and experts.

Weighing the Pros and Cons of Globalization

An examination on the costs and benefits of free and open global trade by Murray Weidenbaum, Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor at Washington University in St. Louis and chairman of the Wiedenbaum Center on the Economy, Government, and Public Policy. These remarks were presented at the Woodrow Wilson Center on March 5, 2003.

The Ambassador's Changing Mission: Commercial Diplomacy in the 21st Century

On April 11, 2005, the Wilson Center and the Council of American Ambassadors hosted a day-long conference focused on the challenges of conducting commerical diplomacy in the 21st century. This report features the proposals garnered from the program's esteemed participants for addressing these issues.