Water Can Be a Pathway to Peace, Not War (No. 1)

By
Aaron Wolf, Annika Kramer, Alexander Carius, and Geoffrey D. Dabelko

Instances of cooperation between riparian nations outnumbered conflicts by more than two to one between 1945 and 1999. Why? Because water is so important, nations cannot afford to fight over it. Instead, water fuels greater interdependence. By coming together to jointly manage their shared water resources, countries can build trust and prevent conflict. Water can be a negotiating tool, too: it can offer a communication lifeline connecting countries in the midst of crisis.

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