About the Middle East Program

The Middle East Program combines the intellectual grounding of its scholars with the power of its convening space to produce actionable ideas for policymakers around the world. Our Program offers a breadth and depth of programming on the prevailing economic, political, and social norms in the MENA region. We pay special attention to the role of women, the aspirations of the younger generation, and democratic and autocratic tendencies in governance... MORE

The Latest from the Middle East Program

Are there any reasons for hope in the Middle East? Maybe.

Article //
Aug 27, 2015
"By threatening everyone, including the Iranians and the Russians, Islamic State will have succeeded in uniting all to defeat it. Yet the price down the road for both countries will be increased pressure to abandon the Assad regime," write Henri Barkey and David Gordon. more

Obama's Failure to Learn in the Middle East

Article //
Aug 26, 2015
"Whether you count yourself a fan of President Barack Obama's Middle East policies or a foe, one thing should be stunningly obvious by now: A good part of the president's foreign policy travails in this region stem from a pattern of needlessly high-flying rhetoric," writes Aaron David Miller. more

MENA Women News Brief

Article //
Aug 25, 2015
The Middle East Program will send out the latest developments on women’s issues in the Middle East and North Africa region on a bi-weekly basis. more

Death, Taxes, and the Slow Destruction of Syria

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Aug 21, 2015
Given this president’s core beliefs — and the circumstances in which he is operating — the “do something, but not a lot” approach in Syria was foreordained. And here’s why, in more or less Obama’s own words. more

Al-Sisi’s Egypt: The Military Moves on the Economy

Publication //
Aug 20, 2015
The al-Sisi regime has chosen a model of development based on the implementation of large, ambitious projects under military supervision. The projects, such as the broadening of the Suez Canal and the building of a new capital city, may fail economically, like many such projects did in the past. No matter the economic impact, al-Sisi’s approach is consolidating the political and economic position of the military and shifting the balance among the private sector, the old state sector controlled by the bureaucracy, and the military economy. The change will be long lasting. more

Experts & Staff