Mexican Politics Resource

This page tracks major political develoments in Mexico and provides publications and analysis on the Mexican political system.

President Enrique Peña Nieto's Cabinet

Jun 27, 2013
The Mexico Institute is pleased to present the following two graphics regarding President Enrique Peña Nieto’s cabinet secretaries and his government’s five specialized cabinets.

Mexico: Commitment to Security and Justice

Apr 12, 2013
The Woodrow Wilson Center's Mexico Institute hosted Mexico's Secretary of the Interior Miguel Ángel Osorio Chong. Secretary Osorio Chong has served as Secretary of the Interior under President Enrique Peña Nieto since December 2012 and was previously Governor of Hidalgo. His address covered the Peña Nieto administration’s security and justice strategies.

Mexico’s telecoms reform bill – The Expert Take

Mar 15, 2013
In his latest expert take contribution, Director Duncan Wood discusses the Peña Nieto administration's bold proposal to open up Mexico's telecommunications to more competition.

Peña Nieto’s Cabinet: What Does It Tell Us About Mexican Leadership?

Mar 12, 2013
An analysis of cabinet leadership in Mexico has always provided insights into political recruitment trends for the policy-making leadership in general. This essay briefly analyzes the backgrounds of the twenty-two cabinet secretaries and important cabinet-level agencies, and the president, and compares them with equivalent leadership, where appropriate, from three prior presidential periods. Those consist of the cabinet members from the pre-democratic era, 1935-1988, from the democratic transition, 1988-2000, and from the democratic era, 2000-2013.

Pacto Por Mexico - The Expert Take

Dec 12, 2012
During the era of the pre-democratic PRI in Mexico there existed a long history of national political pacts. Those pacts typically were between the PRI dominated executive branch and the two most influential actors, labor unions and business organizations. In the 1990s, at the highpoint of the democratic transition, the PRI for the first time in its history lost its ability to ensure a two-thirds vote in the legislative branch, preventing it from accomplishing constitutional changes.

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